Research & Innovation

We invest in life-changing research and pioneering treatments that advance medical care.

RESEARCH & INNOVATION

We invest in life-changing research and pioneering treatments that advance medical care.

Our research and investment in technical innovation means we can test and develop ground-breaking new equipment that informs health care for the future

Our research and investment in technical innovation means we can test and develop ground-breaking new equipment that informs health care for the future

We are the largest stem cell collection centre in Europe. Working with charities such as Anthony Nolan, we collect over 700 stem cell donations a year and safely store them until needed by patients around the world.

We work with leading clinicians on pioneering treatments. Since 2018 we have offered Adaptive Radiotherapy for treating bladder cancer, are are the only private hospital to do so.

We are the only independent hospital research centre in the UK to pioneer brain tumour treatment using Inter Operative Radiotherapy to deliver high dose radiotherapy alongside surgical treatment.

Our cutting-edge Navio® robot with its sophisticated computer navigation is revolutionising knee replacement surgery. Treating patients with this new technology means that we can help them recover and get back to normal more quickly.

Our Clinical Research Centre works with consultants to develop new techniques and learning to advance healthcare. We are studying the impact of running marathons on hips; providing high resolution images for liver, chest and breast cancer studies as well as helping to study the causes and impact of dementia.

"Our Clinical Research Centre team works with world-class clinicians, hospitals, universities and charities to conduct ethically approved medical research that lead to pioneering treatments."

Al Russell, CEO

"Our Clinical Research Centre team works with world-class clinicians, hospitals, universities and charities to conduct ethically approved medical research that lead to pioneering treatments."

Al Russell, CEO

INVESTING IN RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

the INTERNATIONAL BRAIN CANCER CLINICAL TRIAL

Our charitable status is fundamental to who we are as a hospital, enabling us to make investment decisions that support our clinical specialists and benefit patients. The London Clinic Clinical Research Centre is responsible for the management of clinical trials within the hospital, ensuring our charitable purpose of advancing healthcare is realised.

Consultant neurosurgeons Professor Keyoumars Ashkan, Mr Ranj Bhangoo and consultant neuro-oncologist Dr Matthew Williams are leading The London Clinic’s participation in the ‘INTRAGO 2’ phase three, international clinical trial that is currently taking place. 

The aim of the clinical trial is to extend the lives of people affected with glioblastoma multiforme, an aggressive form of brain cancer with poor survival rates, by testing the novel new technology called intra-operative radiotherapy (IORT).

“This offers surgeons the ability to deliver a high and localised dose of radiotherapy to a brain tumour bed during a patient’s surgery,” the consultants say. “We believe that an IORT boost in addition to standard treatment can improve survival rates. The approach has been demonstrated to be effective with breast and colorectal cancers and we are optimistic that this new technique can help people with this aggressive form of brain cancer”

The London Clinic is the only hospital in the UK to participate in this international clinical trial. This is due to the support provided to its clinical experts with an investment into the ‘INTRABEAM’ system – a mobile miniaturised X-ray therapy unit which is not widely available. This enables neurosurgeons to successfully deliver IORT during surgery. It was originally developed for treating metastatic brain tumours before it gained fame in a one-shot radiotherapy solution to treat breast cancer.

The London Clinic’s investment in the ‘INTRABEAM’ mobile system has helped to address the problem that patients needed to be transferred out of the operating theatre and into a linear accelerator bunker. This represents an infection risk in addition to coordination difficulties, as the patient often had to pass through corridors mid-surgery.

Future technologies such as robotic-assisted surgery, virtual reality and in-room 3D surgical imaging can all be integrated with IORT to provide a versatile treatment to the radiotherapy canon in the fight against cancer.

The clinical trial is likely to conclude in 2021 and its success will be to promote the use of IORT as a safe and beneficial treatment that could become the gold standard for glioblastoma multiforme care.

Mr Ranj Bhangoo and Professor Keyoumars Ashkan
Mr Ranj Bhangoo and Professor Keyoumars Ashkan